I appreciate this comment. I’m a doTERRA gal. When I signed up I said I’d never sell. I just wanted to buy and use the oils. Then because of my love for them, people started coming to me for education and asking where they could get oils. So now I sell them. I’m not a sales person. I can’t bug my friends about stuff. But I’m growing this business because I truly believe in the products and use them every single day. I may not ever become rich from this and that’s OK with me. I won’t consider it a failure. Every person I help is a success in my book!
Even, the hard core Amish don’t ‘cut off’ friends and family who choose to not fully live their life in the inner circle of the faithful in their community. If the concept is that basic it stands to reason that as a parody—‘resistance isn’t futile’—and cutting off all the circles of influence who don’t join your inner circle of twenty to ‘reach diamond’ is: And just uncouth at that. So, “no one is a prophet in their own country”: Go out and look for like-minded people to expand that circle without dressing up in business clothes at 5 a.m. on a Saturday morning to head to the cult like MLM “Ra! Ra! Session.” Real friends and family are hard to come by. Grow your marketing network without burning the people who care about you most. And get solid like-minded leads without getting up earlier than any sane Adventist would on a Saturday.
I’ve heard all the arguments. “How can it be a pyramid scheme if it’s legal?” Through some crafty loopholes. The fact that there is an actual product to sell allows them to operate and give the appearance of legitimacy. “You just haven’t found a good MLM yet.” Wrong. A good MLM is an oxymoron. “But how is this any different from any other major corporation where the CEO makes the most money?” Because the people below the CEO at legit companies get paid salaries and have actual benefits. They don’t depend on endless chains of recruiting new members.
The U.S. Federal Trade Commission (FTC) states: "Steer clear of multilevel marketing plans that pay commissions for recruiting new distributors. They're actually illegal pyramid schemes. Why is pyramiding dangerous? Because plans that pay commissions for recruiting new distributors inevitably collapse when no new distributors can be recruited. And when a plan collapses, most people—except perhaps those at the very top of the pyramid—end up empty-handed."[45]
MLMs are successful because they provide tempting possibilities — the more you recruit, the more you sell, and the more you make. The possibility for income seems almost endless. However, only a few companies can make this dream a reality. So how do you spot the good ones from the bad ones? Look at the product. If the company has put time and money into creating a valuable product, they will put time and money into selling it.  
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