Because of the encouraging of recruits to further recruit their competitors, some people have even gone so far as to say at best modern MLMs are nothing more than legalized pyramid schemes[4][19][20] with one stating "Multi-level marketing companies have become an accepted and legally sanctioned form of pyramid scheme in the United States"[19] while another states "Multi-Level Marketing, a form of Pyramid Scheme, is not necessarily fraudulent."[20] In October 2010 it was reported that multilevel marketing companies were being investigated by a number of state attorneys general amid allegations that salespeople were primarily paid for recruiting and that more recent recruits cannot earn anything near what early entrants do.[60] Industry critic Robert L. FitzPatrick has called multi-level marketing "the Main Street bubble" that will eventually burst.[61]
Are you more comfortable turning customers into distributors or distributors into customers? Before you sink effort and your precious money into lead development systems, make sure you have a comfortable recruiting strategy that matches your style and promotional campaign. Know your products and compensation plan, understand how to access the company support systems, and enlist the back-up support of your sponsor. Then you'll be prepared for sponsoring success. Creating leads without the skills to turn them into members of your organization is a formula for disappointment.
The main sales pitch of MLM companies to their participants and prospective participants is not the MLM company's products or services. The products/services are largely peripheral to the MLM model. Rather, the true sales pitch and emphasis is on a confidence given to participants of potential financial independence through participation in the MLM, luring with phrases like "the lifestyle you deserve" or "independent distributor."[16] Erik German's memoir My Father's Dream documents the real life failures of German's father as he is lured into "get-rich-quick" schemes such as Amway.[17] The memoir illustrates the multi-level marketing sales principle known as "selling the dream".[18]
"Your leads scored where others flopped! I purchased phone verified leads for Texas region. This, after I purchased similar leads from another leads provider, which resulted in money-down-the drain. At one point, I entertained thoughts of completely dumping my home based business and go for some traditional business. But instinctively, I decided to give it one more try and fortunately, I found businessopportunityleads.org. The first impression was not a great one, as the website contained all the similar promised. My concern was if your company delivers on these promises. Delivered it did! And that too within no time. As soon as I signed up, my inbox started ringing with real time leads as well as double opt-in leads. A little tweaking in my marketing material was all I needed to turn those fantastic leads into actual sales. A big THANK YOU!!!"
Multi-level marketing, abbreviated as MLM, also called pyramid selling, network marketing and referral marketing, is a controversial marketing strategy for the sale of products and/or services where the revenue of the MLM company is derived from a non-salaried workforce (also called participants, and variously known as “salespeople”, “distributors”, “consultants”, “promoters”, “independent business owners”, etc) selling the company’s products/services, while the earnings of the participants is derived from a pyramid-shaped commission system.
These are just some some of the companies we provide leads for: Ameriplan leads, Coastal Vacation leads, Herbalife leads, Ecoquest leads, Xango leads, Vemma leads, MLM leads, Mannatech leads, Noni leads, Morinda leads, Neways leads, Nuskin leads, Melaleuca leads, Monavie leads, Fruta Vida leads, Prepaid legal leads, Usana leads, Synergy leads, Eventis leads, Emerald Passport leads, Legacy leads, 4life leads, Lifeforce leads, Nikken leads, Mentors in Motion leads, Better Universe leads, Liberty League leads, and many more MLM leads. This is just a sample of the MLM Companies we work with. Our MLM Leads are compatible with all MLM Companies
In a similar fashion, when you eliminate money from the network marketing industry, a new perspective emerges.  Personally speaking, I love talking with people who are in this industry because they are always reading, posting, and sharing something inspirational.  They have goals, a dream board, and are generally using the products that they are selling to improve the way they look and feel.
Fll-Inc can handle the pre-qualification of Business Opportunity Leads. This can be accomplished by gaining information from the leads about what their needs and goals may be. All of the leads are followed up with and examined carefully to ensure that they are suitable Business Opportunity Leads and that they will be able to provide the level of success or results that are desired.

I’m surprised Rodan and Fields didn’t make the list, considering they are the fourth largest premium skin care company with the top three being 50+year old companies, Estée Lauder, Lancôme & Clinique. We are North America’s 4th largest and fastest growing premium skincare company, but we’re not in stores, the top 3 — Clinique, Lancôme and Estée Lauder.
Many MLM companies do generate billions of dollars in annual revenue and hundreds of millions of dollars in annual profit. However, the profits of the MLM company are accrued at the detriment to the majority of the company's constituent workforce (the MLM participants). Only some of said profit is then significantly shared with individual participants at the top of the MLM distributorship pyramid. The earnings of those top few participants is emphasized and championed at company seminars and conferences, thus creating an illusion of how one can potentially become financially successful if they become a participants in the MLM. This is then advertised by the MLM company to recruit more distributors to participate in the MLM with a false anticipation of earning margins which are in reality merely theoretical and statistically improbable.[14]
The Federal Trade Commission warns "Not all multilevel marketing plans are legitimate. Some are pyramid schemes. It's best not to get involved in plans where the money you make is based primarily on the number of distributors you recruit and your sales to them, rather than on your sales to people outside the plan who intend to use the products."[21]
I purchased yalls program. Going through the modules a second time. I have to focus on using Twitter platform not FakeBook who doesn’t like my business apparently. Wasted $15k in 2017 and they put me in FakeBook Jail. For what? Who knows. They have robots for employees not real people. Anyways done with my rant. The modules are great. Very well laid out.
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