I’d like to point out a few things: statistically something like 96% of businesses fail within the first 5-10 years, which is a much more impactful loss, both financially and time wise, than the few hundred dollars one puts into whatever product they’re using in MLM. So realistically the success rate as a “self employed business owner” with MLM is probably a bit better than it is with launching a traditional business, or at least consistent with it. It takes discipline and tenacity that many people don’t have- that’s why they chose to remain employees in the first place.
"Your leads scored where others flopped! I purchased phone verified leads for Texas region. This, after I purchased similar leads from another leads provider, which resulted in money-down-the drain. At one point, I entertained thoughts of completely dumping my home based business and go for some traditional business. But instinctively, I decided to give it one more try and fortunately, I found businessopportunityleads.org. The first impression was not a great one, as the website contained all the similar promised. My concern was if your company delivers on these promises. Delivered it did! And that too within no time. As soon as I signed up, my inbox started ringing with real time leads as well as double opt-in leads. A little tweaking in my marketing material was all I needed to turn those fantastic leads into actual sales. A big THANK YOU!!!"
Also called pyramid selling or network marketing, multi-level marketing companies grow revenue by hiring and recruiting non-salaried employees referred to as distributors, influencers, consultants, salespeople, or promoters (among other names). In other words, employees generally receive compensation from performance through a pyramid-shaped compensation system.
The Federal Trade Commission warns "Not all multilevel marketing plans are legitimate. Some are pyramid schemes. It's best not to get involved in plans where the money you make is based primarily on the number of distributors you recruit and your sales to them, rather than on your sales to people outside the plan who intend to use the products."[21]
Many MLM companies do generate billions of dollars in annual revenue and hundreds of millions of dollars in annual profit. However, the profits of the MLM company are accrued at the detriment to the majority of the company's constituent workforce (the MLM participants). Only some of said profit is then significantly shared with individual participants at the top of the MLM distributorship pyramid. The earnings of those top few participants is emphasized and championed at company seminars and conferences, thus creating an illusion of how one can potentially become financially successful if they become a participants in the MLM. This is then advertised by the MLM company to recruit more distributors to participate in the MLM with a false anticipation of earning margins which are in reality merely theoretical and statistically improbable.[14]
In order to remain competitive in a market that is constantly changing you’re going to need to reach out and market directly to any and all of your prospective customers. We here at ListGuy want to help you find those prospective customers so we have made it a goal to provide you with some of the absolute best tools that are required for you to succeed in a highly complex marketing industry. We specialize in offering current Biz Opp Lists so you can begin to reach out to all of your prospective customers and start making the sales you want.
Twitter offers a more automated means of lead capture. With a target web site, either your own or the ‘offer’ money site, you are in a position to write short articles or blogs and then post Tweets carrying links to these articles. Keep those down to about 10% of the total, linking the other 90% to interesting on-topic snippets elsewhere on the web. Then use a good scheduler to queue a week or two’s Tweets and then let it run on auto pilot.
Another issue that Amway and other companies were dinged for was how reps would lure people into coming to a "meeting" to hear how they could "leverage time and money." There are two problems related to this. The first is that many companies, in safeguarding their brand, don't allow reps to advertise their name. This practice means reps have to find a way to entice people to learn about them without saying the company name, which can seems suspicious.
There are many red flags that should warn you away from a business or financial opportunity, but the biggest is a lack of a product. Programs that push recruiting over the sales of a product or service might be a pyramid scheme. If a company isn’t focused on acquiring more customers to buy its products, but rather it's interested in "building a team" or membership of sales reps, consider it a red flag. The foundation of any good MLM business is about getting products and service to end consumers.

Write articles or blogs. Writing is an effective way to get in front of your market through other people's websites, and your only cost is that of your time in writing. The key to writing an article or blog that another site will run is to make it useful and informative, but not advertorial. As a network marketer, you have two types of articles and markets: The first is related to your product or service. If you sell candles, for example, then write a Valentine's Day post on creating romance with candles or something about how candles can improve mood. The second option is related to direct sales and the MLM business. For example, you can write articles about how your MLM career changed your life or how to be successful in direct sales for lifestyle and business websites. Just know that most places won't want you to directly promote your business within the article, but they may allow you to include a link to your website in your bio.
I’ve heard all the arguments. “How can it be a pyramid scheme if it’s legal?” Through some crafty loopholes. The fact that there is an actual product to sell allows them to operate and give the appearance of legitimacy. “You just haven’t found a good MLM yet.” Wrong. A good MLM is an oxymoron. “But how is this any different from any other major corporation where the CEO makes the most money?” Because the people below the CEO at legit companies get paid salaries and have actual benefits. They don’t depend on endless chains of recruiting new members.

A 2018 poll of 1,049 MLM sellers across various companies found that most sellers make less than the equivalent of 70 cents an hour. Nearly 20 percent of those polled never made a sale, and nearly 60 percent earned less than $500 in sales over the past five years.[42][43] Nearly 32 percent of those polled acquired credit card debt to finance their MLM involvement.[44]
Here we’ve got a throwback to network marketing’s roots (Remember Tupperware parties? No? There’s a reason for that). Kitchen products, cooking demos, and mommy bloggers galore. Stay-at-home-moms looking for some flexibility are still a HUGE target demographic for MLM, so it’s no surprise that Pampered Chef has done so well that Warren Buffett decided he needed a piece of the action.
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